MORMONS ARE RUNNING THE AZ BOARD OF NURSING

This is a BIG deal, huge. If you do not know anything about mormons, you may be shocked to learn how they infiltrate into your nursing career.

They do not drink coffee, who cares why , but drinking alcohol, is not their thing and so they judge you by their bringing up . Which consists of huge doses of brain washing. ! A recent case , a man surrendered he had a dui. They ordered a psych evaluation, he admitted he had had a glass of champagne on New years and a glass of wine at a birthday party. ONE GLASS , the evaluation showed NOT ADDICTED . the mormon board president (and the former bd president MORMON) UH !! Carolyn McCormies, says the dumbest things, and will ruin you for life . Stated she has CONCERNS , that he is still drinking . (two drinks in 3 years folks !! ) not kidding. She went on about he admitted that he is STILL DRINKING .

So , is he suppose to not have a drink for the rest of his life / career of nursing in AZ??

Pick up a mormon book, they tell them all bad things are satan driven. They have a strong dislike for homosexuals. Beware , if you go before this board , they love to control and run everyone’s lives, and over step isn’t the word . just crazy .

One thought on “MORMONS ARE RUNNING THE AZ BOARD OF NURSING”

  1. IF this is not a pattern of the BON , 4 ‘options’ , of course most of the craziest cases are based on nothing nursing. And should never be a bd issue or business ! Then the part ‘ you can reapply ” . OMG. First you have medical people who are not following science , making public statements. Then you have those who do and are kicked out of the cult. CRAZY! Judged by a cult on her medical teachings , too much ! And don’t forget she was being punished and accused of speaking ill of the crazy cult.
    SALT LAKE CITY (KUTV) — A certified sex therapist says she is facing excommunication from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints for her teachings regarding sexuality. Teachings she says are her “ethical responsibility” to provide in her role as a licensed sex therapist.

    One of very few sex therapists in the LDS world, 49-year-old Natasha Helfer says she is facing charges of apostasy for her teachings which are in line with mental health professionals, but which go against some of the teachings of the LDS Church, of which she’s been a member since she was 5 years old. It’s a story that caught the eye of the Washington Post.

    Helfer said:

    I am bound by ethical and regulatory processes in my profession and, in fact, had been specifically trained on many ethical trainings, that to bias my professional services through my own religious beliefs or background, is unethical, causes undue harm, and could get my license revoked. Not to mention, that after much education into all of these matters, and serving my community who have brought these issues into my office daily for almost 25 years, I not only speak to my positions from a professional perspective, but also from personal conviction.”

    Natasha Helfer Parker (Photo: Courtesy Natasha Helfer Parker)

    Helfer posted a 13-miute YouTube video, embedded below, sharing her thoughts about her upcoming disciplinary council in the Derby, Kansas stake where she lived between 2008 and 2019. In the LDS Church, a stake is a group of congregations, called wards. Each stake and ward have a geographical boundary associated with it, and LDS members living in that boundary are automatically members of that ward and stake.

    RELATED: Victims speak: Shame haunts woman for decades after bishop interview

    LDS Church disciplinary councils are meetings between a church member or members, and local leaders. After the meeting, the council then decides whether to discipline the member. There are four possible outcomes of a membership council. Each of the explanations for each action is quoted from the church’s newsroom website.

    No action – “The council may determine there is no need for any further action and that the individual should continue to work with their local Church leader to overcome their challenges.”
    Formal probation – “Formal probation is a temporary state of discipline where the member may be asked to refrain from taking the sacrament, holding Church positions, participating in meetings or engaging in temple worship. During this probationary period, the individual meets frequently with their ecclesiastical leader to help encourage progress toward repentance.”
    Disfellowshipment – “Like formal probation, disfellowshipment is usually temporary, though the time frame may be longer and is generally at least a year. Someone who has been disfellowshipped is still a member of the Church, and they are encouraged to attend meetings, though in those settings they are not permitted to pray, teach, take the sacrament, attend the temple or give sermons in public settings. Men are not able to perform priesthood duties.”
    Excommunication – “The most serious sanction the disciplinary council may prescribe is a loss of Church membership. This is a course of last resort and is only taken when less serious disciplinary measures are insufficient. Those who have lost their Church membership may continue to attend public Church meetings, though they are restricted in their participation in the same way as someone who has been disfellowshipped. Additionally, they would not be permitted to pay tithes to the Church. Though they are no longer a Church member, their local leader may offer continued counsel and guidance. If a person shows sincere and full repentance and wishes to return to the Church, they will be welcomed. Rebaptism is necessary in such cases.”

    If the member disagrees with a decision made at the ward level, they can appeal to their stake. Appeals at the stake level are sent to the First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, which is comprised of the church’s top three leaders including its president. The church says, “such appeals are uncommon.”

    Helfer’s disciplinary council is scheduled for Sun., April 18 at 7:30 p.m. CDT through her Kansas ward.

    Those who are excommunicated from the church can reapply for membership after at least one year, meeting certain conditions.

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